Thursday, 16 November 2017

Embankment (ZEK)

Embankment is a major interchange station on the London Underground on the North bank of the Thames near Trafalgar Square and inbetween London Charing Cross and London Waterloo.

Information
Type: Transport for London
(Bakerloo, Circle,
District & Northern Lines)
Station code: ZEK
Opened: 1870
Platforms: 6
The station was opened in 1870 by the District Railway as part of its extension from Westminster to Blackfriars [1]. The station was near to Charing Cross railway station and also named Charing Cross. The Baker Street & Waterloo Railway's (later Bakerloo Line) deep-level tube line reached the station in 1906. Although next to the District Railway station and with an interchange the Baker Street & Waterloo called their station Embankment (Charing Cross) [2].

The Charing Cross, Euston & Hampstead Railway (later the Northern Line) reached the station in 1914. To avoid confusion the entire station was renamed Charing Cross in 1915. The station was renamed Charing Cross Embankment in 1974 and finally to just Embankment in 1976. The Bakerloo/Northern Line station Strand/Trafalgar Square station to the North was renamed Charing Cross [3]!


Embankment is served by the Circle & DIstrict Lines on the sub-surface platforms and the Bakerloo & Northern Lines on the deep-level platforms. The station received a major refurbishment in 1988 with gloss white vitreous panelling in many areas of the station. LU commissioned the artist Robyn Denny to produce artwork to lighten up the station which resulted in the coloured streamer design [4].
An S Stock train departs on the sub-surface platforms

Northern Line 95ts 51646 arrives on a North bound service

This way to the Bakerloo Line

Sub-surface platforms

A Bakerloo Line train waits to depart

As does a District Line train

[1] Jason Cross, London Underground Guide 2017 (Train Crazy, 2017) p. 120 
[2] Mike Horne, The Bakerloo Line (Capital Transport, 2001) p. 18
[3] Chris Nix, Hidden London Charing Cross (London Transport Museum, 2017) p. 5
[4] Paul Moss, London Underground (Haynes, 2014) p. 140